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on video How Manual Transmission works - automotive technician shifting

 


Getting-in-Gear
When the car is idling and the gearshift is in neutral, it can't go anywhere until you press down on the clutch and apply the gas. Pressing the clutch pedal and putting the gear shift into first gear forces a shifting rod to move the selector toward first gear. The gear is mounted to the crankshaft in your engine, which ultimately sets your wheels in motion using the driveshaft.

The car doesn't go into gear until the synchronizer meshes with the gear, making sure the two shafts spin at the same speed. When you press down on the gas and lift your foot off the clutch, the engine receives more power and the car moves.

Each gear has a specific size and only allows so much output before you must shift to the next gear up. Thus, the reason why driving a stick is so difficult: You have to manually adjust the gears. In automatic cars, this whole process is automated internally, meaning less work for the driver.


 


Getting-in-Gear
When the car is idling and the gearshift is in neutral, it can't go anywhere until you press down on the clutch and apply the gas. Pressing the clutch pedal and putting the gear shift into first gear forces a shifting rod to move the selector toward first gear. The gear is mounted to the crankshaft in your engine, which ultimately sets your wheels in motion using the driveshaft.

The car doesn't go into gear until the synchronizer meshes with the gear, making sure the two shafts spin at the same speed. When you press down on the gas and lift your foot off the clutch, the engine receives more power and the car moves.

Each gear has a specific size and only allows so much output before you must shift to the next gear up. Thus, the reason why driving a stick is so difficult: You have to manually adjust the gears. In automatic cars, this whole process is automated internally, meaning less work for the driver.


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