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on video Servo Motors, how do they work?

 



A servomotor is a motorized system capable of reaching predetermined positions and then maintaining them. The position is: in the case of a rotary motor, an angle value and, in the case of a linear motor, a distance. Electric motors (continuous, asynchronous, brushless) are used as well as hydraulic motors. Starting and maintaining the predetermined position are controlled by an adjustment system.

For precise position adjustment, the motor and its adjustment are equipped with a measuring system which determines the current position (eg the angle of rotation traveled relative to a starting position) of the motor. This measurement is performed on a rotary setting, e.g. ex. a resolver, an incremental adjustment or an absolute adjustment (e.g. realizable by a potentiometer).

The often electronic adjustment system compares the signal with a prescribed value of the set position. If there is a deviation, the motor is controlled in the direction that guarantees the shortest path to take to arrive at the setpoint. This has the effect of reducing the difference. The procedure is repeated for as long as and until the current value is found incrementally or via an approximation within the tolerance thresholds of the setpoint. Alternatively, the position of the motor can also be entered digitally and compared via a suitable computer with a prescribed value.

To some extent, these motors can be replaced by stepper motors which incur less expense. However, stepper motors can, under certain conditions, make positioning errors (skip steps). In addition, servomotors – usually with gearbox – can deliver higher torques and be operated with higher rotational speeds, which is favorable in dynamic applications which particularly require high work safety or downtimes. quick adjustments.

An alternating current or direct current electric motor is paired with a reducing gear train which drives an axis with a great torsion force. Generally, the rotation of this axis is restricted to only 180 degrees by an internal mechanism. Electronic components detect the actual position of the axis and control the rotation of the electric motor as long as the position of the axis does not conform to that required by the external command.



 



A servomotor is a motorized system capable of reaching predetermined positions and then maintaining them. The position is: in the case of a rotary motor, an angle value and, in the case of a linear motor, a distance. Electric motors (continuous, asynchronous, brushless) are used as well as hydraulic motors. Starting and maintaining the predetermined position are controlled by an adjustment system.

For precise position adjustment, the motor and its adjustment are equipped with a measuring system which determines the current position (eg the angle of rotation traveled relative to a starting position) of the motor. This measurement is performed on a rotary setting, e.g. ex. a resolver, an incremental adjustment or an absolute adjustment (e.g. realizable by a potentiometer).

The often electronic adjustment system compares the signal with a prescribed value of the set position. If there is a deviation, the motor is controlled in the direction that guarantees the shortest path to take to arrive at the setpoint. This has the effect of reducing the difference. The procedure is repeated for as long as and until the current value is found incrementally or via an approximation within the tolerance thresholds of the setpoint. Alternatively, the position of the motor can also be entered digitally and compared via a suitable computer with a prescribed value.

To some extent, these motors can be replaced by stepper motors which incur less expense. However, stepper motors can, under certain conditions, make positioning errors (skip steps). In addition, servomotors – usually with gearbox – can deliver higher torques and be operated with higher rotational speeds, which is favorable in dynamic applications which particularly require high work safety or downtimes. quick adjustments.

An alternating current or direct current electric motor is paired with a reducing gear train which drives an axis with a great torsion force. Generally, the rotation of this axis is restricted to only 180 degrees by an internal mechanism. Electronic components detect the actual position of the axis and control the rotation of the electric motor as long as the position of the axis does not conform to that required by the external command.



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