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on video how to make a simple 4500 W inverter, sine wave,

 



how to make a simple 4500 W inverter, sine wave,

Frequency operation in inverters
Inverters basically involve frequencies or oscillations for the implementation of amplification and inversion actions.
 The frequency we know is the generation of pulses at some uniform and calculated pattern, for example a typical inverter frequency can be rated at 50Hz or 50 positive pulses per second.

The fundamental frequency waveform of an inverter is in the form of square pulses.

As we all know, a square wave is never suitable for using sophisticated electronic equipment such as TV, music players, computers, etc.

The AC (alternating current) mains that we acquire from our household mains socket also consists of frequency pulsing current, but these come in the form of sine waves or sine waves.

It is normally 50Hz or 60Hz depending on the utility specification of the country.

The above mentioned sine curve of our home AC waveform refers to the exponentially increasing voltage peaks that make up the 50 cycles of the frequency.

Since our household alternating current is generated by magnetic turbines, the waveform is inherently a sine wave, so it does not require any additional processing and becomes directly usable in homes for all types of devices.

Conversely in inverters, the fundamental waveform is in the form of square waves which require extensive processing in order to make the unit compatible with all types of equipment.

Difference between square wave and sine wave
As shown in the figure, a square wave and a sine wave may have the same peak voltage levels, but the RMS value or the root mean square value may not be the same. This aspect is what makes a square wave particularly different from a sine wave even though the peak value may be the same.

Therefore, a square wave inverter working with 12V DC would generate output equivalent to 330V, just like a sine wave inverter working with the same battery, but if you measure the RMS output of the two inverters, it would differ significantly (330V and 220V). ).


how to make a simple 4500 W inverter, sine wave,

Frequency operation in inverters
Inverters basically involve frequencies or oscillations for the implementation of amplification and inversion actions.
 The frequency we know is the generation of pulses at some uniform and calculated pattern, for example a typical inverter frequency can be rated at 50Hz or 50 positive pulses per second.

The fundamental frequency waveform of an inverter is in the form of square pulses.

As we all know, a square wave is never suitable for using sophisticated electronic equipment such as TV, music players, computers, etc.

The AC (alternating current) mains that we acquire from our household mains socket also consists of frequency pulsing current, but these come in the form of sine waves or sine waves.

It is normally 50Hz or 60Hz depending on the utility specification of the country.

The above mentioned sine curve of our home AC waveform refers to the exponentially increasing voltage peaks that make up the 50 cycles of the frequency.

Since our household alternating current is generated by magnetic turbines, the waveform is inherently a sine wave, so it does not require any additional processing and becomes directly usable in homes for all types of devices.

Conversely in inverters, the fundamental waveform is in the form of square waves which require extensive processing in order to make the unit compatible with all types of equipment.

Difference between square wave and sine wave
As shown in the figure, a square wave and a sine wave may have the same peak voltage levels, but the RMS value or the root mean square value may not be the same. This aspect is what makes a square wave particularly different from a sine wave even though the peak value may be the same.

Therefore, a square wave inverter working with 12V DC would generate output equivalent to 330V, just like a sine wave inverter working with the same battery, but if you measure the RMS output of the two inverters, it would differ significantly (330V and 220V). ).

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