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on video How does an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) work?

 


Across today's highly connected and data-driven business landscape, the need for continuous, clean power cannot be overstated. Even the briefest amount of downtime can be devastating to an organization, regardless of its size or vertical. Not only is the current price tag for downtime estimated at $5,600 per minute, but unplanned incidents can result in equipment damage, data loss, missed opportunities and tarnished reputation.

Thankfully, an uninterruptible power system (UPS) is one of the most simple, cost-effective solutions to help companies avoid the unwelcome consequences of downtime. But with several different types of systems available, the challenge is selecting the one that best matches your needs and budget.

What Is a UPS?
A UPS is a backup system that provides power in the event of a utility failure. By supplying an adequate window to safely shut down sensitive equipment, a UPS helps prevent data loss and minimizes the stress of a hard shutdown on electronics. But protecting equipment against a complete power loss isn't the only reason you need a UPS. Depending on the UPS model, these systems also shield connected devices from common power problems and unsafe output voltage fluctuations that can damage electronics, reduce lifespan and affect performance.

How Does a UPS Work?
Essentially a battery in a box, a UPS powers the devices that are plugged in to its AC outlets when the flow of electricity drops to an inadequate voltage, or if a complete outage occurs. In case of a blackout, the UPS immediately switches to battery to provide a continuous power source for the length of the battery, which varies by system for periods of time ranging from minutes to hours.

Depending on the size and technology of the unit, a UPS is capable of protecting a single computer up to an entire data center. Essential for mission-critical environments, a UPS keeps computer systems and IT equipment safe and operational during a power loss until generators can be activated or protected devices such as servers and network components can be properly shut down, preventing loss of data and work-in -progress. In addition to delivering backup power during a utility failure, UPSs also afford varying degrees of protection against other damaging power problems, including voltage sags, surges, brownouts, line noise, frequency variations, overvoltage conditions, and switching transients and harmonic distortion.



 


Across today's highly connected and data-driven business landscape, the need for continuous, clean power cannot be overstated. Even the briefest amount of downtime can be devastating to an organization, regardless of its size or vertical. Not only is the current price tag for downtime estimated at $5,600 per minute, but unplanned incidents can result in equipment damage, data loss, missed opportunities and tarnished reputation.

Thankfully, an uninterruptible power system (UPS) is one of the most simple, cost-effective solutions to help companies avoid the unwelcome consequences of downtime. But with several different types of systems available, the challenge is selecting the one that best matches your needs and budget.

What Is a UPS?
A UPS is a backup system that provides power in the event of a utility failure. By supplying an adequate window to safely shut down sensitive equipment, a UPS helps prevent data loss and minimizes the stress of a hard shutdown on electronics. But protecting equipment against a complete power loss isn't the only reason you need a UPS. Depending on the UPS model, these systems also shield connected devices from common power problems and unsafe output voltage fluctuations that can damage electronics, reduce lifespan and affect performance.

How Does a UPS Work?
Essentially a battery in a box, a UPS powers the devices that are plugged in to its AC outlets when the flow of electricity drops to an inadequate voltage, or if a complete outage occurs. In case of a blackout, the UPS immediately switches to battery to provide a continuous power source for the length of the battery, which varies by system for periods of time ranging from minutes to hours.

Depending on the size and technology of the unit, a UPS is capable of protecting a single computer up to an entire data center. Essential for mission-critical environments, a UPS keeps computer systems and IT equipment safe and operational during a power loss until generators can be activated or protected devices such as servers and network components can be properly shut down, preventing loss of data and work-in -progress. In addition to delivering backup power during a utility failure, UPSs also afford varying degrees of protection against other damaging power problems, including voltage sags, surges, brownouts, line noise, frequency variations, overvoltage conditions, and switching transients and harmonic distortion.



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