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on video 8 switch 2 socket 1 fuse 1 indicator 1 fan regulator board wiring connection || Sinha Electricals

 



Electricity is a form of energy resulting from the existence of charged particles
(such as electrons or protons)
An electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge past a point or region. In
electric circuits this charge is often carried by electrons moving through a wire.
Voltage, also called electromotive force, is the potential difference in charge
between two points in an electrical field
It results in Current
There are two types of current widely used:
o Direct current (DC), in which electrons flow in one direction. DC power is
widely used in low voltage applications such as charging batteries,
automotive applications, aircraft applications and low current applications.
Solar panels produce DC power
o Alternating current, (AC) in which the electric charge changes direction
periodically. Household outlets are Alternating Current
Electricity has many uses in our day to day life. It is used for
lighting rooms, working fans and domestic appliances like using
electric stoves, AC and more.
• In factories, large machines works on electricity.
• One cannot imagine comfort without electricity. Allhospitals,
agriculture, cinema houses, educational institutes, railways,
business, entertainment and many more depends upon
electricity.
• Hence, electricity plays a wide role in the progress of any nation
> Volts: Electromotive force or potential difference, expressed in volts(V)
> W: Watt is the unit of power. One watt is defined as the energy consumption
rate of one joule per second. 1W = 1J / 1s. One watt is also defined as the
current flow of one ampere with voltage of one volt.
It is named after James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine.
> kW: 1000 Watt
> kWh: The kilowatt-hour is a unit of energy equal to 3600 kilojoules (3.6
megajoules). 1 kWh equals one hour of electricity usage at a rate of 1 kW, and
thus the 2 kW appliance would consume 2 kWh in one hour, or 1 kWh in half an
hour.
> The equation is simply kW x time = kWh
> The kilowatt-hour is commonly used as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers
by electric utilities.


 



Electricity is a form of energy resulting from the existence of charged particles
(such as electrons or protons)
An electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge past a point or region. In
electric circuits this charge is often carried by electrons moving through a wire.
Voltage, also called electromotive force, is the potential difference in charge
between two points in an electrical field
It results in Current
There are two types of current widely used:
o Direct current (DC), in which electrons flow in one direction. DC power is
widely used in low voltage applications such as charging batteries,
automotive applications, aircraft applications and low current applications.
Solar panels produce DC power
o Alternating current, (AC) in which the electric charge changes direction
periodically. Household outlets are Alternating Current
Electricity has many uses in our day to day life. It is used for
lighting rooms, working fans and domestic appliances like using
electric stoves, AC and more.
• In factories, large machines works on electricity.
• One cannot imagine comfort without electricity. Allhospitals,
agriculture, cinema houses, educational institutes, railways,
business, entertainment and many more depends upon
electricity.
• Hence, electricity plays a wide role in the progress of any nation
> Volts: Electromotive force or potential difference, expressed in volts(V)
> W: Watt is the unit of power. One watt is defined as the energy consumption
rate of one joule per second. 1W = 1J / 1s. One watt is also defined as the
current flow of one ampere with voltage of one volt.
It is named after James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine.
> kW: 1000 Watt
> kWh: The kilowatt-hour is a unit of energy equal to 3600 kilojoules (3.6
megajoules). 1 kWh equals one hour of electricity usage at a rate of 1 kW, and
thus the 2 kW appliance would consume 2 kWh in one hour, or 1 kWh in half an
hour.
> The equation is simply kW x time = kWh
> The kilowatt-hour is commonly used as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers
by electric utilities.


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