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on video 2.4GHz vs 5GHz WiFi: What's the Difference?

 


Today, we'll go into the difference between 2.4GHz and 5GHz and when you should use one over the other.
If you have a wireless router (802.11n or newer), chances are it offers WiFi on two separate bands (dual bands): 2.4GHz and 5GHz.

You may have noticed this as you searched for your Wi-Fi network on a new device and noticed that there were two (or even three) with the same name, but one (or two) was designed for 5GHz service.

  Range or Speed
In general, the difference between 2.4GHz and 5GHz boils down to wireless range vs. speed. If you want better range, use 2.4 GHz. If you need higher performance or speed, use the 5GHz band.

The 5GHz band, which is the newer of the two, has the potential to cut through network clutter and interference to maximize network performance. Which means this band will be better for things like reducing game lag.

5GHz more channels for communication and usually there aren't as many competing devices on the newer band. But by design, 5GHz can't reach as far as the 2.4GHz. Newer routers have both 2.4GHz and 5GHz, giving you a choice of which band to use.


 


Today, we'll go into the difference between 2.4GHz and 5GHz and when you should use one over the other.
If you have a wireless router (802.11n or newer), chances are it offers WiFi on two separate bands (dual bands): 2.4GHz and 5GHz.

You may have noticed this as you searched for your Wi-Fi network on a new device and noticed that there were two (or even three) with the same name, but one (or two) was designed for 5GHz service.

  Range or Speed
In general, the difference between 2.4GHz and 5GHz boils down to wireless range vs. speed. If you want better range, use 2.4 GHz. If you need higher performance or speed, use the 5GHz band.

The 5GHz band, which is the newer of the two, has the potential to cut through network clutter and interference to maximize network performance. Which means this band will be better for things like reducing game lag.

5GHz more channels for communication and usually there aren't as many competing devices on the newer band. But by design, 5GHz can't reach as far as the 2.4GHz. Newer routers have both 2.4GHz and 5GHz, giving you a choice of which band to use.


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